Tag Archives: Thought

Haters Hate, Creators Create

Haters, haters, haters: they will always keep on hating,
So, give exactly zero fucks to what they say, and keep creating.
Dream so big and weird, that everyone will think you’re “nuts,”
Then, laugh until it makes you cry, while counting up your bucks.

Enjoy what you have earned… After all, you do deserve it,
But don’t forget the little guy who’s thinking he’s not worth it.
For some reason, he didn’t walk the “recommended” path,
Plus, Life’s a ‘number’s game;’ he just got left out in the math.

A day, not long ago, that lonely lunatic was you!
Remember how it felt thinking there’s nothing you could do?
You’ve finally made it to the promised land, why ever leave?
The goal was never wealth, but getting hopeless to believe.

  • Not Chris Hoeller
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Sensors vs Intuitives – What Role Does Each Type Play in Society?

I hear often, when talking to another intuitive person for the first time about personality types, the same general complaint:

“So and so” [A Sensing Type] thinks I’m weird. [An Intuitive Type]

The best is the look on the person’s face, when I respond with: “Well, they (The Sensing Type) are absolutely correct.”

“Weird,” by definition, is something that is abnormal, uncanny, strange, unusual, or unexpected.

So, the Sensing-dominant person is correct for multiple reasons:

STATISTICS AND PROBABILITY

Right off the bat, 70% of the population prefers Sensing, versus only 30% favoring Intuition. This means that intuitives are actually less likely to exist, according to pure statistics.

The Sensing Type person is probably “normal,” which means conforming to a standard; usual, typical, or expected. They are significantly more populous in society, making them more expected.

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Business from the Future – Eliminating the Sales Department

I Despise Most Traditional “Sales” Methods…

It’s because I think too much like a customer. Even when when I’m working for the company in question, I purposefully maintain the delusion of merely being a regular customer.

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I pretend to be the customer, so that I am completely fair, honest, and effective at enhancing products and services.

I don’t have the cognitive biases associating with being an employee.

It’s not in my best interest that a product is perfect, so I can clearly point out weaknesses:

  • I haven’t invested a year of my life creating a product I conceived of.
  • I haven’t spent millions of dollars building it.
  • I am not a fanboi.
  • I don’t subconsciously invent excuses.
  • I don’t like going through the experience of some random person making me feel pressured.
  • I certainly don’t care what his personal opinion of which product is better, since I’ve already spent 3 hours online “being Colombo” about all the potential options.
  • My mind is 90% – 97% made up, before I take a single step into the store.
  • Replace Salesmen with Consultants or Advisors

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    Customers certainly don’t want to feel pressured. Hold up, though, that doesn’t mean to eliminate the staff:

    Instead of salesmen (whose primary objective is selling a product), employees will be helpful consultants (whose primary objective is to ensure that the customer has the best experience possible, even if it means losing a sale):

  • To ensure that the customer fully understands the product.
  • To answer any of their questions.
  • To help them make decisions.
  • To ensure that every customer connects with a product that will enhance their lives in some way.
  • Chris Hoeller

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    The Rule of Thirds

    I know that I have high expectations compared to the “average consumer,” but that’s because I don’t tolerate excuses.

    I know that a high level of customer experience can be achieved, every time, if the focus is put in the right places. The area, where focus is most often currently placed — profit — will take care of itself, if the customer experience is taken care of.

    This is one of the reasons why I feel that I am more capable, beyond my years of experience, to run a company is because I my “big picture” focus is where companies need to be placing their effort. Effort should be placed equally in three areas of the business:

    The Rule of Thirds

    • 1/3 on maintaining an excellent product quality.
    • 1/3 on amazing and memorable customer experiences.
    • 1/3 on constant innovation (thinking of ways to improve).

    Rule of Thirds

    If effort is placed equally on these three areas, businesses will result both in fantastic short-term success, but more importantly long-term customer loyalty and retention.

    For those who feel that customer retention plays a relatively minor role in helping a company grow a healthy bottom line, here are a few statistics you might be interested in:

    According to Bain and Co., a 5% increase in customer retention can increase a company’s profitability by 75%. 

    And if those numbers don’t impress you, Gartner Group statistics tell us that 80% of your company’s future revenue will come from just 20% of your existing customers. 

    Still not sold on customer retention? One final statistic provided by Lee Resource Inc. should give you plenty to think about:

    Attracting new customers will cost your company 5 times more than keeping an existing customer.

    – Forbes.com

    Polymath

    polymath

    I am a student of everything. I learn from the world around me. I study the math of the universe, the art of life, and the working of nature. I ponder the reasons behind existence. I stare up at the night sky and am amazed at the vastness of what is. I learn from everyone I meet and anyone who will teach me. I invent, I create, and I build. I am not confined by my career or job or degree. I am more than that. I will not be one thing: I will be everything. I am a POLYMATH.

    Gifted Individuals Make a Significant Contribution to Innovation in Organizations

    With their creative talents, gifted individuals can make a useful contribution to innovations within organizations. Highly gifted individuals possess many more creative possibilities than the average gifted person.

    three-ring_model_of_giftedness

    To make use of their innovative ideas and to implement them, however, an effective interaction between gifted individuals and their work environment is essential.

    How do gifted individuals contribute to innovation?

    GiftedThinking

    • The gifted individual can easily identify the relationships between goals, missions, and assignments.
    • The gifted individual has the ability to focus intensely on the content.
    • Arguments based on content are key.
    • Habits, traditions and social pressure are quickly spotted. If these seem to be in conflict with the content, they are discarded as being irrelevant.
    • Thinking ‘outside of the box’ is second nature to them.
    • Switching between one’s own professional area and other disciplines is no problem at all.
    • The opinion of a formal authority does not weigh any heavier than the opinion of another party.
    • Information from others is checked against one’s own experience or against other information.
    • The gifted individual has a high degree of commitment and passion.
    • Existing protocols, structures and approaches are only followed if they seem to be effective and are well-founded.
    • A customized solution is sought for each individual situation, often when this has not been requested. ‘Standard problems’ are also approached in this way.

    Favorable environmental factors required for making use of these contributions are listed below. The favorable characteristics listed correspond strongly with the ‘task culture’ and ‘person culture,’ while the unfavorable characteristics correspond with the ‘role culture’ or ‘power culture’ from “Harrison’s typologies of organizational culture.

    Favorable and Unfavorable Organizational Characteristics for the Gifted

    Favorable organizational characteristics:

    • Flexibility.
    • Little hierarchy.
    • Few procedures (only if they are useful).
    • The development and needs of employees are of importance.
    • Room for productive conflicts.
    • Power and influence can be acquired through expertise, dedication and success (or, at most, through personality, ability and outstanding performances).

    Unfavorable organizational characteristics:

    • Procedures determine the work.
    • Power and influence are predominantly dependent upon your position.
    • The development and needs of the employee are of little importance.
    • Conflicts are often avoided.

    How can giftedness be recognized?

    The-Gifted-People-How-Explained-Cursed-Smart-Brain-.jpg.opt640x480o0,0s640x480

    If an employee arrives at your consulting room, how do you recognize the above-mentioned characteristics of giftedness?

    • Wide interest in all kinds of fields (curious and passionate).
    • Sensitive to, such as, noise at work (highly sensitive).
    • Can speak passionately about a subject that interests him or her, starts speaking more quickly, the eyes light up, makes agitated gestures (passionate).
    • Quick analyses of the work situation: ‘that’s how it works’ (highly intelligent).
    • Focussed primarily on the content of the work (highly intelligent).
    • Wants to work in his/her own way (autonomous).
    • Wants to see a lot of variety in the work (creation-directed).
    • Produces unorthodox solutions that are not generally accepted (sparkling original).

    Focus points for the problem analysis

    • Gifted individuals suffer relatively often from stress and burnout. Factors that can be of influence here are the nature of the work (sufficient challenge), the degree of autonomy and the defining of borders. Gifted employees are especially passionate and have the tendency to insufficiently specify their own limits.
    • Bullying, or other forms of aggression: because a gifted individual does not fit the requirements of the ‘average’ employee. As a result, fear/anxiety disorders may arise.
    • Depressive feelings often start at an early age. Gifted individuals can therefore more easily feel lonely and isolated.
    • Fear of failure as a result of setting the bar high and the tendency to perfectionism.
    • The gifted individual can come across as having ADHD. The combination of giftedness and ADHD is not uncommon.
    • Gifted individuals have a high sensitivity for odors and sounds.
    • They more quickly experience certain circumstances as being a hindrance.