Tag Archives: product development

Google Glass Will Become the “Calculators” of the Medical Industry (and Several Others)

Doctor Glass

 

Google Glass is Going to Medical School

The University of California at Irvine (UCI) School of Medicine announced that it’s integrating the iconic wearable tech into its four-year curriculum for medical students.

Glass Finds its First Professional Home

Google has had the #glassexplorers program, which allows individuals to buy #Glass for personal use, but they have also donated pairs of +Google Glass to various industries and professions. 

This was to see which industries found usage of the device beneficial, right out of the box. By “right out of the box,” I mean using the product as it now exists, which is essentially glasses with a built-in camera and a display that projects an Augmented Reality menu to navigate (along with a few basic apps). 

The Future of Glass

Possibilities are endless. Along with releasing the base models of #Glass, Google also released Glass’s API. This means that, as we speak, developers from all over the world are testing out and building Apps made specifically for the device. 

In general, it’s mutually understood that eventually #Glass will be able to (at least):

  • Automatically identify objects and people, using facial recognition and object recognition (remember Google Goggles?).
  • Determine which objects or people are relevant to the user.
  • Present useful data, relevant to the user, about the world around them, in an augmented overlay.

All of this will happen in real-time, and only in ways that will help the user. It will be possible, but horrific, for #Glass to identify everything in view and present information about it. The idea is that #Glass will become smart enough to know when to present what info: 

“Technology that’s there when you need it, and invisible when you don’t.”

This is my paraphrasing of Glass’s original mission statement, and is the entire reason for its existence. The idea is that technology is awesome and helps us in so many ways, but has negatively affected our social behavior. We text and drive, text and walk, text and eat, surf and poop, google while having conversations, and are constantly looking down at a screen.

With glass, we’re accepting that technology is too beneficial and enjoyable to cut from our lives. We’re also accepting that our current set up is not an ideal one. We’re smarter, more globally connected, and more productive, but at the cost of being less social (in life) and less engaged in our surroundings.

Wearable Technology is Born to Bring us the Best of Both Worlds

With wearable tech devices, such as Glass, we do not have to choose either being immersed in technology or being engaged in the real world. We will be able to have our cake and eat it too.

Getting to that point will take a bit of time, advancement of the technology, trial and error, and lots of tweaking (not twerking). However, it is a certainty, since all the foundational building blocks are already there. 

Come back in a decade, and you’ll see a different, improved society.

The Medical Industry has demonstrated the strongest immediate benefit of utilizing this new technology. The video/audio and communication capabilities of Glass are the primary functions being used, now, but more uses will come…

Doctors Using Glass ~2024:

  • A doctor, wearing #Glass, walks into a patients room.
  • Glass automatically identifies the patient, using facial recognition.
  • Glass pulls up the patient’s medical records.
  • Glass displays the most relevant aspects of the records in an augmented overlay being projected directly into the doctor’s eye, so only he can see the info.
  • The doctor says, “OK Glass, let’s do a physical exam.”
  • Glass opens up a medical app for performing physical examinations on patients.
  • The questions that the doctor needs to ask the patient pop up in his display.
  • As he asks the questions, Glass records the patient’s responses, converting speech to text, filling out the exam.
  • After the questions are complete, Glass displays the next steps for the doctor (i.e. Check blood pressure, heart rate, reflexes, temperature, ear check, throat check, etc.).
  • In real-time, the Medical app is not only filling out the forms automatically, it is trained to spot certain patterns.
  • This advanced pattern recognition compares live, incoming data, the patient’s history, and a database of medical knowledge, #Glass pops up a recommended diagnosis of the patient.

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Yes, I know exactly what I’m implying.

This gadget, considered a high-tech, $1,500 novelty-toy by the mainstream, could essentially replace doctors (as we know them) in as soon as a decade. I don’t think doctors will be eliminated, by any means, but I do see a future where Medical school is 2 – 4 years of schooling plus another 2 – 4 years of hands-on training. 

Google Glass will be the Calculators of the Medical Industry (and Several Others):

You can do complicated math problems, manually, but why would you waste the time? Do it quick on the calculator, cut time and errors, and then spend the extra time doing something actually beneficial.

Same as the future of medicine… Keep doctors, but will it be necessary for that much schooling, memorizing hoards of information, to make a diagnosis that a device can do faster and more accurately?

Doctors of the Future

  • Learn the basics of the industry.
  • Become a master of the tools.
  • Reduce education cost and time.
  • Improve ability to diagnose complex illnesses (Some illnesses may be so complex that they now cannot be discovered).

Also, use the exponentially increased productivity to:

  • Personalize treatment.
  • Invest more in research.
  • Provide medical care in places of the world with a shortage of doctors.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Rule of Thirds

I know that I have high expectations compared to the “average consumer,” but that’s because I don’t tolerate excuses.

I know that a high level of customer experience can be achieved, every time, if the focus is put in the right places. The area, where focus is most often currently placed — profit — will take care of itself, if the customer experience is taken care of.

This is one of the reasons why I feel that I am more capable, beyond my years of experience, to run a company is because I my “big picture” focus is where companies need to be placing their effort. Effort should be placed equally in three areas of the business:

The Rule of Thirds

  • 1/3 on maintaining an excellent product quality.
  • 1/3 on amazing and memorable customer experiences.
  • 1/3 on constant innovation (thinking of ways to improve).

Rule of Thirds

If effort is placed equally on these three areas, businesses will result both in fantastic short-term success, but more importantly long-term customer loyalty and retention.

For those who feel that customer retention plays a relatively minor role in helping a company grow a healthy bottom line, here are a few statistics you might be interested in:

According to Bain and Co., a 5% increase in customer retention can increase a company’s profitability by 75%. 

And if those numbers don’t impress you, Gartner Group statistics tell us that 80% of your company’s future revenue will come from just 20% of your existing customers. 

Still not sold on customer retention? One final statistic provided by Lee Resource Inc. should give you plenty to think about:

Attracting new customers will cost your company 5 times more than keeping an existing customer.

– Forbes.com

Apple patent details optical image stabilization for iPhone cameras

Gigaom

When it comes to smartphone cameras, Apple(s aapl) might not use as many megapixels as the rest of the competition, but the iPhone is generally believed to have one of the best mobile cameras out there. Just yesterday a report came out saying that Apple might retain the same 8-megapixel camera sensor it uses now for the iPhone 6, focusing instead on features like optical image stabilization. And it looks like that very well may be the case, judging by a patent published on Thursday that was spotted by Unwired View.

According to the patent – which is for a VCM OIS actuator module – Apple has been working on optical image stabilization since at least as early as the patent was filed in late 2012. The language in the patent describes:

A lens actuator module including an autofocus (AF) mechanism capable of moving a lens according to at…

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