Tag Archives: Myers-Briggs Type Indicator

Introduction to Socionics

What is socionics?

Socionics is a theory of human interaction based on fixed patterns of information processing known as “socionic types.” A socionic type (there are 16 of them) is a description of some very fundamental ways in which a person’s psyche works. These psychic qualities define to a large degree a person’s relationships with others, his or her perception of life as a whole, and the niche he or she strives to occupy among people.

Each person’s psyche is a lopsided construction that attempts to pursue certain kinds of information (stimuli) while minimizing others. This is what socionic type describes. This lopsidedness creates a need for social cooperation. The nature of close cooperation (relationships) between people depends on how well-suited people’s lopsided psychic tendencies are to each other. This is what intertype relations are about.

The origins of socionics

As the story goes, founder of socionics Aushra Augusta (she shortened her last name from “Augustinavichiute” to “Augusta” to make it easier for foreigners) was mulling over fundamental issues of human existence (“why are some relationships good and others bad despite everyone’s intention to have good ones?”) in Vilnius, Lithuania in the 1970s, when she came across a number of typological systems that influenced her thoughts — Kretschmer’s psychosomatic types (i.e. endomorphs, mesomorphs, and ectomorphs), Kempinsky’s (now a forgotten Polish psychiatrist) concept of “information metabolism,” and — most of all — Carl Jung’s typology of psychological types.

Augusta created symbols to represent the functions described by Carl Jung and — together with a circle of fellow researchers/hobbyists — eventually created what is known as the “socionic model of the psyche” — a neat description of the psyche where each of the 8 information elements has its place in each person’s psyche. This was quite a development on Jung’s typology and introduced many new concepts, including the mechanisms that explain how types interact.

Socionic types

The 16 socionic types differ on four axes (called ‘dichotomies’): rationality/irrationality, extraversion/introversion, intuition/sensing, and logic/ethics. Each type has one characteristic from each of the dichotomies, making 16 possible combinations. This does not mean there is a complete absence of the opposite mechanism, however. It means that one is more flexible and multi-faceted, while the other is more rigid and simplistic.

Although types often display similar values, life strategies, general behavior, and facial expressions, such traits such as IQ, musical talent, sports abilities, charisma, “personal power,” etc. are little related to type. A review of how socionists have typed famous people will demonstrate this. No type is inherently “predisposed” for success or failure in life. A common error of socionics enthusiasts is to try to relate non-socionic traits to socionic types.

In addition, socionics does not view type structure as being so rigid that a person can change little in life. One’s positive or negative thinking patterns, overall outlook on life, and emotional health are not tied to type and are quite flexible. However, socionic type is one of the things — along with inborn physiological traits — that does not change, even if outward behavior, emotional states, and attitudes do. Socionic type describes psychic mechanisms so “deep” that they are difficult to gain a full awareness of, much less modify in some way (but then, why would you want to modify them??).

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Intertype relations

The basic difference between socionics and other typologies is socionics’ theory of intertype relations. Socionics is not a typology of personality, but a typology of perceptual traits that define one’s relationships with others. Hence, we should not be surprised to see significant personality differences between individuals of the same socionic type — as long as we see that there is a similar pattern of intertype relations.

Intertype relations describe the nature of interaction and information interchange between two people at a close psychological distance by describing how partners’ psychic functions interrelate. These socionic relationships range from very difficult and potentially harmful to one’s self-realization to very beneficial and pleasant to the psyche. Intertype relations most influence one’s informal relationships with others, where one chooses friends based on pleasure and mutual benefit (cooperation).

Duality and dual relations

Socionics_duality_ILE-SEI   ILE & SEI

A unique aspect of socionics is the discovery of complementary psychic structures. Jung and his followers recognized a particular attraction between individuals with certain leading functions, but these observations were not developed into a full-fledged theory, and the Meyers-Briggs system does not seem to address them at all.

Each of the 16 socionic types has its ‘dual’ type. The essence of dual relations is that the natural information output of one type is the preferred information input of the other. Having a dual or dual around stimulates one to use one’s strengths as much as possible. Even their mere physical presence tends to exert a calming and balancing influence. Dual relations develop around the strongest functions of each partner and keep mental and physical functioning balanced, while directing partners’ energy towards constructive and rewarding activities.

Socionics and the MBTI

At some point Augusta and her associates learned of Isabel Briggs Myers’ and her mother Katharine Cook Briggs’ development of Jung’s typology across the ocean in the United States. Newcomers to socionics in the West often have to face the difficulty of trying to distinguish between the two typologies. They are fundamentally different and cannot be treated as “the same types, but with different type names.”

Those who look deeply into socionics and the MBTI recognize that socionics’ theoretical apparatus is more systematic and logical in nature — and simply larger. Indeed, socionics was created by a “thinking” type, while the MBTI was created by “feeling” types (a quick review of sites on the two fields will make this clear). That is just the beginning of the differences.

I personally, of course, find socionics to be a big improvement on the MBTI, but I’m sure there are ardent followers of the MBTI that hold the opposite opinion.

The four socionic dichotomies appear to be very similar to the dichotomies used by the MBTI system. However, close inquiry reveals that there are many subtle differences. If you assume the dichotomies are the same and equate each socionic type to an MBTI type, some socionic types will overlap to a large degree with their MBTI counterparts, others will partially overlap, and yet others will seem to be completely different. If the types were truly equivalent, a similar theory of intertype relations would have arisen in the MBTI system — but there is none. On the whole, MBTI and socionics types seem to correlate in roughly 30% of cases. That is not nearly enough to consider the two typologies close approximations of each other.

The socionics community

There is a large socionics community across the Russian-speaking world. In many if not most large cities of the former Soviet Union there are people who hold evening classes on socionics and social gatherings for people interested in socionics. Centers of socionics are Kiev (Ukraine), Moscow and St. Petersburg (Russia), and Vilnius (Lithuania). Here socionics conferences take place where socionists present and discuss papers and studies and most books on socionics are published (there are now maybe 40 or 50 books on socionics, primarily in Russian, but also with a few in Ukrainian and Lithuanian).

At the same time, socionics is a decentralized field of study. There is no central body that is universally recognized as the single authority in the field or that dictates methodology, type identification, etc. Socionics arose outside of the academic world (although Augusta was a sociologist) and has not yet obtained official academic recognization, though it is now often mentioned in psychology courses in universities around the former USSR. Competent and respected socionists generally are known in the community and publish in community journals and participate in seminars and professional dialogue.

Socionics is held together by numerous enthusiasts and scattered professionals — who publish books and journals, teach courses, diagnose types, and consult individuals, families, and even entire organizations.

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Dr. House is 100% an ENTP, and Most Definitely Not an INTJ

Backwards Time Machine

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Dr. House is portrayed as the kind of genius that gets to be a jerk and buck the system because he’s just that good. He uses deductive reasoning of the Sherlock Holmes type to solve complicated medical cases.

Though he seems to value as the most important thing in life, he frequently (and, very occasionally, admittedly) uses it to manipulate himself and others more than to create a truly consistent logical system for everything.

His somewhat random and energetic behavior is not really indicative of a IJ temperament in any sense.

Though highly confrontational, he is decidedly manipulative, rather than physical. His aggression seems intellectual in nature, and his aim is to be recognized as smart and correct, rather than powerful and in control.

His best friend Wilson appears to be an SEI and SLI who compulsively befriends “needy” individuals.

o Extremely calculating and logical; absence of empathy.

o Disdainful…

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ENTPs Make Poor Managers but Exceptional Leaders

I was asked on a forum “how an ENTP can be an effective manager.” My original advice:

  • Look busy.
  • Keep making the rounds.
  • Allow people to know you for your spontaneity and use it as a plus (like you could be checking up on them at any time).
  • Stay available to reach.
  • Find a great ISTJ assistant who naturally thrives on organization.

When I try too hard to stay organized, I usually end up exhausting all of my effort into creating the organizational tool (that’s just me personally). I find that by staying in motion and in touch with every department, your natural Ne will pick up on the missing pieces. I could spend ten hours inventing a method to stay on top of everything, or I could simply walk around and allow it to happen naturally.

ENTPs don’t make good “traditional managers,” but can still be quite effective, even in traditional corporate environments (if the structure isn’t too rigid).

To add upon my earlier half-joking statements about “looking busy and keep making the rounds,” or my support of getting an ISTJ secretary, the true power of an ENTP manager / leader comes from their ability to delegate, empower, and encourage. It is this quality that makes for poor ENTP managers but exceptional ENTP leaders.

ENTPs don’t want to demand stuff of others, because we hate it when it’s done to us. However, an ENTP can delegate out responsibilities by simply asking, explaining why it’s important, and making their subordinates feel empowered and trusted. This makes an ENTP manager / leader a force to be reckoned with, and soon you’ll have the staff working with you to accomplish the goals, not simply working for you out of fear of reprimand.

Surprise me

The staff will respect and trust you, because you respect and trust them. I know it sounds cliché, but it actually works. Employees will work HARDER for you than any other type of manager, or should I say, leader. Good luck!

The ENTP Personality

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ENTPs love telling conceptual stories. They will often go off at tangents, weaving apparently contrary pieces of information into a conceptual whole, bringing others in and teaching them in the process.

Curious, communicative and challenging, the ENTP loves intellectual debate, is spontaneous, (at times shockingly so), and assertive. They have a kaleidoscope type vision, seeing all the disparate parts and then, in one twist, pulling them all together into something often quite wonderful.

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These characteristics also mean the ENTP can be intellectually promiscuous, enjoying one new experience after another, one new idea after another and constantly looking for bigger and better things. They are also better at the ‘front end’ of projects and may lose interest once the first fascination has passed.

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The ENTP is expedient, will disregard rules, regulations and even obligations and follow their own instincts and urges.

ENTPs are usually verbally as well as cerebrally quick, and generally love the chaos, to argue and engage in robust discussions often for its own sake, and to prove their often impressive skills. They tend to have a perverse sense of humour as well, and enjoy playing devil’s advocate. They sometimes confuse, even inadvertently hurt, those who don’t understand or accept the concept of debate or argument simply as a ‘sport.’ ENTPs are as creative and ingenious at problem-solving and verbal gymnastics, as they are bored with the routine, the detail and the ‘this has been done before.’

ENTPs are excitable and this excitement is very often contagious. They have ‘the gift of the gab,’ and are at ease in social situations, winning people over and can adapt to any level and any conversation – if it interests them. They are generally confident and have the ability to look far beyond the present, the mundane, the facts and the horizon. However their very inferior sensing function, and dislike of closure, often means that their dreams, aspirations and ideas may come to nothing as they can lack the propensity for follow through and the attention to detail required to ‘complete.’

This does of course make the ENTP very flexible and they have the ability to change tack in a nano-second much to the consternation of those following, who ask ‘but I thought we were going in that direction?’ Rules are there to be (gently but firmly) bent; they like to get their own way and will happily rationalize, intellectualize and build a new and Cartesian argument to prove they were right. Of course next week they may change their minds because ‘right’ for the ENTP is about what is right for ‘now.

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Curious, child-like wonder characterizes the ENTP, they are flexible, open-minded and love possibilities. They tend to see everything as a challenge, seeing opportunities even in the most difficult of circumstances. The desire to ‘keep the plates spinning,’ and explore as many options as possible means that the ENTP may be too slow to get to closure or make the call and this can work against them in actually getting things done. Being an ENTP they tend to be shrewd enough to realise their failings and they do have the ability to do something about it – but only if they choose!

ENTPs are optimists, and major setbacks tend to be seen as challenges, and tackled with determination. But smaller, less significant issues can really get to them and see them becoming scratchy and impatient. ENTPs can at times display impatience with those whom they consider wrong or less intelligent, and will on occasions show little restraint in demonstrating this. However, there is an enjoining, charming quality to the ENTP, which is generally sustained even when life is providing them with more than enough ‘challenges.’

In terms of their relationships with others, ENTPs are capable of bonding very closely and quickly. ENTPs are also good at acquiring friends who are as clever and entertaining as they are. ENTPs are nothing if not unique. Making, discovering and developing connections between and among two or more of anything is almost automatic. ENTPs are in the business of change, improvement, and radical experimentation.

Visual Identification of Personality Types

The link I share is the type that I am, Ti-ENTp. Here is the other type of ENTP, called a Ne-ENTP. They all look and act the same!!

It’s like I’m discovering a scientific breakthrough, here.

All the Ti-ENTPs have thin faces with dark hair and a skinny complexion. They are all big science / inventor geeks and intellectuals.

All the Ne-ENTPs are mostly comedians or actors, and almost all of them have reddish hair / reddish tinted bodies.

All the Ti-ENTps act and even look similar to me.

This ain’t the zodiac, my friends…

There’s some real science behind this. Who dares continue on the research that was started so long ago? Who dares to answer the question of why we are different / unique and how that we are built to perform different functions in society…

I mean besides me, lol… I need a team!

 

ENTP – In Depth Description

Great insights on the ENTP… We are an odd bunch, eh?

Journal of the Mischievous

Okay now lets talk about ENTP. If you don’t know what is it, learn about it MBTI personality types (google it, I’m not going to explain it here).

First of all, why jack sparrow? Jack sparrow is one of my favorite fictional ENTP along with Barney Stinson, The Joker, and Robert Downey’s Tony Stark . Basicly, ENTPs are the the playful, yet brainy type. Maybe charming and clever is the best word to describe them.

They possess confidence in themselves and their abilities. You might recognize them as the people who willingly lead others into the unknown. In a nutshell, they are leaders. ENTPs enjoy taking risks, challenges, and developing strategies for getting things done. ENTPs are highly independent and will resist routine and rules that don’t make sense or that are simply for the sake of rules. They push against boundaries and boundary-makers. Many ENTPs are entrepreneurs and they…

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The ENTP Writing Personality: Energetic Innovation

“Obedience hardly ever begets
innovation.”

– Neil deGrasse Tyson

Can learning about personality type help you make the most of your natural writing / leadership style?

ENTP writers enjoy the pre-writing stage. They may come up with many good ideas quickly.

Often skilled at detecting patterns and envisioning outcomes, they trust their insight and resist prescribed methods. The writing process itself may prove tedious to them, but if they persevere, their work is often thorough and multifaceted.

The ENTP personality type is one of 16 identified by the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, a popular psychometric instrument used to determine how people prefer to gather information and make decisions. The initials ENTP indicate the following:

E: Extraversion preferred to introversion

ENTPs get their energy from people and activity in their external world. Spending time alone can leave them listless and bored. They enjoy interacting with a large group of friends and acquaintances. They generally act before reflecting.

N: iNtuition preferred to sensation

ENTPs are abstract thinkers, placing more trust in flashes of insight than in experience. They’re less interested in sensory data than in the patterns perceived by the unconscious mind. ENTPs tend to be intellectually restless—they want to change the world.

T: Thinking preferred to feeling

ENTPs prefer to use their thinking function when making decisions. They place more emphasis on the rule of logic than on the effect that actions have on people. They tend to be skeptical in evaluating ideas, whether their own or someone else’s.

P: Perception preferred to judgment

ENTPs like to keep their options open. They enjoy beginning new projects and exploring opportunities as they arise. ENTPs think in terms of possibilities rather than likelihoods.

Are you an ENTP writer or content creator? If so, the following information may give you some insight into how temperament influences your writing style. Use these insights to help you play to your strengths and compensate for your natural blind spots.

Of course these strategies would apply to non-writers as well… really any position that requires you to get a message across, which could include Marketing / Advertising, Leadership / Management in general, and other types of professions. (Such as being a Teacher, Lawyer, or an Entrepreneur).

Writing Process of the ENTP

If you’re an ENTP, you may approach a writing project in the following ways:

– You’re rarely at a loss for ideas. While many people struggle to find a topic, you may have difficulty limiting yourself to just one.

– You may enjoy exploring controversial subjects or devising clever solutions to problems. Have fun playing with different possibilities, and see where they lead you.

– You can benefit from collaborative writing projects. Chances are, you prefer an active, high-energy environment. You may enjoy discussing and debating your ideas with others.

– You will probably assert your individuality even within the group. If someone else is leading the project, be careful that your natural tendency to ignore authority doesn’t undermine the team. If you maintain goodwill, you’ll stand a better chance of convincing someone else to do the actual writing.

– You may do well to compose an article, essay, or story by speaking into a voice recorder. If the thought of transcribing the recording sounds unbearably tedious to you, consider paying (or persuading) someone else to do it.

– To sustain your enthusiasm, gather visual elements to use in the piece. Devise your own strategies to make the writing process more interesting.

– You are motivated by a desire to innovate.

– You tend to seek a unique approach even to ordinary topics. Conversely, you tend to be good at making complex subjects clear and interesting. Stay focused, and let your desire to prove your competence and ingenuity drive you forward until the project is complete.

Potential Blind Spots of the ENTP

As an ENTP, you may experience the following pitfalls:

– You generally enjoy brainstorming but may not feel motivated to write until you feel the pressure of a deadline. To avoid a time crunch at the end of the project, set milestones along the way. Make your best guess of how long each step should take, then double it. Schedule enough time to take breaks so you can consider new possibilities.

– To stay energized, try working in a variety of settings.

– You may excel at satire, and humor can liven up your work. Make sure your tone is appropriate for the piece and for the audience.

– You may find it helpful to include a personal story or two, rather than relying on cold logic alone to make your point.

– You tend to grasp the big picture and to focus on the future. Ensure that your work contains enough background material and concrete detail. To avoid tangents or a cursory treatment of the subject, keep the central thesis or purpose of the project in mind while writing. Solicit feedback from someone whose competence you trust.

Remember, there’s no right or wrong approach to writing. Each individual is unique, so don’t let generalities limit you. Do what works best for you.