Tag Archives: Intuition

Sensors vs Intuitives – What Role Does Each Type Play in Society?

I hear often, when talking to another intuitive person for the first time about personality types, the same general complaint:

“So and so” [A Sensing Type] thinks I’m weird. [An Intuitive Type]

The best is the look on the person’s face, when I respond with: “Well, they (The Sensing Type) are absolutely correct.”

“Weird,” by definition, is something that is abnormal, uncanny, strange, unusual, or unexpected.

So, the Sensing-dominant person is correct for multiple reasons:

STATISTICS AND PROBABILITY

Right off the bat, 70% of the population prefers Sensing, versus only 30% favoring Intuition. This means that intuitives are actually less likely to exist, according to pure statistics.

The Sensing Type person is probably “normal,” which means conforming to a standard; usual, typical, or expected. They are significantly more populous in society, making them more expected.

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ENTPs Make Poor Managers but Exceptional Leaders

I was asked on a forum “how an ENTP can be an effective manager.” My original advice:

  • Look busy.
  • Keep making the rounds.
  • Allow people to know you for your spontaneity and use it as a plus (like you could be checking up on them at any time).
  • Stay available to reach.
  • Find a great ISTJ assistant who naturally thrives on organization.

When I try too hard to stay organized, I usually end up exhausting all of my effort into creating the organizational tool (that’s just me personally). I find that by staying in motion and in touch with every department, your natural Ne will pick up on the missing pieces. I could spend ten hours inventing a method to stay on top of everything, or I could simply walk around and allow it to happen naturally.

ENTPs don’t make good “traditional managers,” but can still be quite effective, even in traditional corporate environments (if the structure isn’t too rigid).

To add upon my earlier half-joking statements about “looking busy and keep making the rounds,” or my support of getting an ISTJ secretary, the true power of an ENTP manager / leader comes from their ability to delegate, empower, and encourage. It is this quality that makes for poor ENTP managers but exceptional ENTP leaders.

ENTPs don’t want to demand stuff of others, because we hate it when it’s done to us. However, an ENTP can delegate out responsibilities by simply asking, explaining why it’s important, and making their subordinates feel empowered and trusted. This makes an ENTP manager / leader a force to be reckoned with, and soon you’ll have the staff working with you to accomplish the goals, not simply working for you out of fear of reprimand.

Surprise me

The staff will respect and trust you, because you respect and trust them. I know it sounds cliché, but it actually works. Employees will work HARDER for you than any other type of manager, or should I say, leader. Good luck!

Visual Identification of Personality Types

The link I share is the type that I am, Ti-ENTp. Here is the other type of ENTP, called a Ne-ENTP. They all look and act the same!!

It’s like I’m discovering a scientific breakthrough, here.

All the Ti-ENTPs have thin faces with dark hair and a skinny complexion. They are all big science / inventor geeks and intellectuals.

All the Ne-ENTPs are mostly comedians or actors, and almost all of them have reddish hair / reddish tinted bodies.

All the Ti-ENTps act and even look similar to me.

This ain’t the zodiac, my friends…

There’s some real science behind this. Who dares continue on the research that was started so long ago? Who dares to answer the question of why we are different / unique and how that we are built to perform different functions in society…

I mean besides me, lol… I need a team!

 

The ENTP Writing Personality: Energetic Innovation

“Obedience hardly ever begets
innovation.”

– Neil deGrasse Tyson

Can learning about personality type help you make the most of your natural writing / leadership style?

ENTP writers enjoy the pre-writing stage. They may come up with many good ideas quickly.

Often skilled at detecting patterns and envisioning outcomes, they trust their insight and resist prescribed methods. The writing process itself may prove tedious to them, but if they persevere, their work is often thorough and multifaceted.

The ENTP personality type is one of 16 identified by the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, a popular psychometric instrument used to determine how people prefer to gather information and make decisions. The initials ENTP indicate the following:

E: Extraversion preferred to introversion

ENTPs get their energy from people and activity in their external world. Spending time alone can leave them listless and bored. They enjoy interacting with a large group of friends and acquaintances. They generally act before reflecting.

N: iNtuition preferred to sensation

ENTPs are abstract thinkers, placing more trust in flashes of insight than in experience. They’re less interested in sensory data than in the patterns perceived by the unconscious mind. ENTPs tend to be intellectually restless—they want to change the world.

T: Thinking preferred to feeling

ENTPs prefer to use their thinking function when making decisions. They place more emphasis on the rule of logic than on the effect that actions have on people. They tend to be skeptical in evaluating ideas, whether their own or someone else’s.

P: Perception preferred to judgment

ENTPs like to keep their options open. They enjoy beginning new projects and exploring opportunities as they arise. ENTPs think in terms of possibilities rather than likelihoods.

Are you an ENTP writer or content creator? If so, the following information may give you some insight into how temperament influences your writing style. Use these insights to help you play to your strengths and compensate for your natural blind spots.

Of course these strategies would apply to non-writers as well… really any position that requires you to get a message across, which could include Marketing / Advertising, Leadership / Management in general, and other types of professions. (Such as being a Teacher, Lawyer, or an Entrepreneur).

Writing Process of the ENTP

If you’re an ENTP, you may approach a writing project in the following ways:

– You’re rarely at a loss for ideas. While many people struggle to find a topic, you may have difficulty limiting yourself to just one.

– You may enjoy exploring controversial subjects or devising clever solutions to problems. Have fun playing with different possibilities, and see where they lead you.

– You can benefit from collaborative writing projects. Chances are, you prefer an active, high-energy environment. You may enjoy discussing and debating your ideas with others.

– You will probably assert your individuality even within the group. If someone else is leading the project, be careful that your natural tendency to ignore authority doesn’t undermine the team. If you maintain goodwill, you’ll stand a better chance of convincing someone else to do the actual writing.

– You may do well to compose an article, essay, or story by speaking into a voice recorder. If the thought of transcribing the recording sounds unbearably tedious to you, consider paying (or persuading) someone else to do it.

– To sustain your enthusiasm, gather visual elements to use in the piece. Devise your own strategies to make the writing process more interesting.

– You are motivated by a desire to innovate.

– You tend to seek a unique approach even to ordinary topics. Conversely, you tend to be good at making complex subjects clear and interesting. Stay focused, and let your desire to prove your competence and ingenuity drive you forward until the project is complete.

Potential Blind Spots of the ENTP

As an ENTP, you may experience the following pitfalls:

– You generally enjoy brainstorming but may not feel motivated to write until you feel the pressure of a deadline. To avoid a time crunch at the end of the project, set milestones along the way. Make your best guess of how long each step should take, then double it. Schedule enough time to take breaks so you can consider new possibilities.

– To stay energized, try working in a variety of settings.

– You may excel at satire, and humor can liven up your work. Make sure your tone is appropriate for the piece and for the audience.

– You may find it helpful to include a personal story or two, rather than relying on cold logic alone to make your point.

– You tend to grasp the big picture and to focus on the future. Ensure that your work contains enough background material and concrete detail. To avoid tangents or a cursory treatment of the subject, keep the central thesis or purpose of the project in mind while writing. Solicit feedback from someone whose competence you trust.

Remember, there’s no right or wrong approach to writing. Each individual is unique, so don’t let generalities limit you. Do what works best for you.

Personality Types – Clarifying, Breaking it Down, and Making Sense of it All

Under the Surface of G

Clarification

When people begin to understand the basics of MBTI, there are a few preconceived notions that we’re going to drop immediately:

Extraverted vs Intraverted

People assume that if they have an E in the front of their type, they are an Extrovert, or the opposite with an I. Although this tends to be true, this is not what the MBTI is talking about, whatsoever.

  • Each of these four functions has an Extraverted version and and an Intraverted version.
  • The Extraverted and Intraverted versions of a cognitive functions has unique qualities, independent of each other.
  • “Extraverted” means what is shown to to the outside world, and “Intraverted” is what happens on the inside.

Ever notice how when dealing with MBTI types, the terminology is “Extraverted,” not “Extroverted?”

This means that those four cognitive functions just became eight unique functions. For example, instead of Intuition (N), there is actually Ne and Ni: Extraverted Intuition and Intraverted Intuition.

“I switch between being an Exxx and an Ixxxx”

No. You don’t.

It is not the person that is an extrovert or introvert, it is that the cognitive functions have an Extraverted and an Intraverted version. However, if your dominant function happens to be an Extraverted one, it does pretty much mean that you will be more of an Extrovert. So, you may have been correct, but by accident!

Breaking it Down

There are 16 Personality Types.

Each “Type” represents a unique predictable pattern of how the eight processes (functions) are used in everyday life.

In most of what we do, we rely on two of the processes, the dominate function and the auxiliary function, as a preferred way of accessing information and a preferred way of organizing and evaluating that information.

In truth, we have access to all eight cognitive processes. The other six are often in the background, playing other kinds of roles.

MBTI Chart

The Primary Processes

The primary processes are those used in the first four roles.

Each process tends to emerge and develop at different times in our lives. During these times we are drawn to activities that use these processes.

Then, learning the content and the skills that engage these processes is often nearly effortless. We find our interest is drawn to them and our interest is pulled away from things we were drawn to before.

1. The Leading Role (Dominant)

The process that plays the leading role is the one that usually develops early in childhood. We tend to engage in this process first, trusting it to solve our problems and help us be successful.

Being the most trusted and most used, it usually has an adult, mature quality to it. While we are likely to engage in it rather automatically and effortlessly, we have much more conscious control over it.

The energy cost for using it is very low. Much like in the movies, the leading role has a heroic quality as using it can get us out of difficult situations.

2. The Supporting Role (Auxiliary)

The supporting role is how we are helpful to others as well as supportive of ourselves.

Once we have developed some facility with our leading role process, we are more likely to feel comfortable engaging in our supporting role process.

In its most positive form, this can be quite like a nurturing parent. In its more negative aspect, it can be overprotective and stunting and not helpful.

When the leading role process is an extraverted one, the supporting role process is introverted.

When the leading role process is an introverted one, the supporting role process is extraverted and may be quite active and visible as it provides a way of dealing with the outer world.

3. The Relief Role (Tertiary)

The relief role gives us a way to energize and recharge ourselves. It serves as a backup to the supporting role and often works in tandem with it.

When we are younger, we might not engage in the process that plays this role very much, unless our life circumstances require it or make it hard to use the supporting role process.

Usually, in young adulthood we are attracted to activities that draw upon this process.

The relief role often is how we express our creativity. It is how we are playful and childlike. In its most negative expression, this is how we become childish. Then it has an unsettling quality, and we can use this process to distract ourselves and others, getting us off target.

4. The Aspirational Role (Inferior)

The aspirational role usually doesn’t develop until around midlife. We often experience it first in its negative aspect of projecting our “shoulds,” fears, and negativities onto others.

The qualities of these fears reflect the process that plays this role, and we are more likely to look immature when we engage in the process that plays this role. There is often a fairly high energy cost for using it, even when we acquire the skill to do so.

As we learn to trust it and develop it, the aspirational role process provides a bridge to balance in our lives. Often, our sense of purpose, inspiration, and ideals have the qualities of the process that plays this role.

The Shadow Processes

The other four cognitive processes operate more on the boundaries of our awareness. It is as if they are in the shadows and only come forward under certain circumstances.

We usually experience these processes in a negative way, yet when we are open to them, they can be quite positive.:

5. The Opposing Role

The opposing role is often how we get stubborn and argumentative—refusing to “play” and join in whatever is going on at the time.

It might be easy for us to develop skill in the process that plays this role, but we are likely to be more narrow in our application of this skill, and it will likely take more energy to use it extensively.

In its positive aspect, it provides a shadow or depth to our leading role process, backing it up and enabling us to be more persistent in pursuit of our goals.

6. The Critical Parent Role

The critical parent role is how we find weak spots and can immobilize and demoralize others.

We can also feel this way when others use the process that plays this role.

It is often used sporadically and emerges more often under stressful conditions when something important is at risk. When we engage it, we can go on and on.

To access its positive side of discovery, we must learn to appreciate and be open to it. Then it has an almost magical quality and can give a profound sense of wisdom.

7. The Deceiving Role

The deceiving role fools us into thinking something is important to do or pay attention to.

The process that fills this role is often not trusted or seen as worthy of attention, for when we do engage it, we may make mistakes in perception or in decision making. Then we feel double bound—trapped between two bad options.

Yet this role can have a positive side as it provides comic relief. Then we can laugh at ourselves. It can be refreshing and join with the relief role as we recharge ourselves through play.

8. The Devilish Role

The devilish role can be quite negative. Using the process that plays this role, we might become destructive of ourselves or others. Actions (or inactions) taken when we engage in the process that plays this role are often regretted later.

Usually, we are unaware of how to use the process that fills this role and feel like it just erupts and imposes itself rather unconsciously. Yet when we are open to the process that plays the devilish role, it becomes transformative. It gives us the impetus to create something new—to make lemonade out of lemons, rather than lament their sourness.

Decoding an Actual MBTI type – ENTP

I will break down an actual type, how this all fits together. We will use my type, an ENTP, as the example.

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ENTP actually means: Ne, Ti, Fe, Si, Ni, Te, Fi, Se

Dominant – Extraverted intuition (Ne)

Ne finds and interprets hidden meanings. This intuitive play weaves together insights and experiences from various sources to find the whole, which can then become a catalyst to action.

Ne allows the ENTP effortlessly to identify complex interrelationships between ideas, people, and things that are often invisible to most other personality types.

The Supporting Role (Auxiliary) – Introverted thinking (Ti)

Ti seeks precision, such as the exact word to express an idea. It notices the minute distinctions that define the essence of things, then analyzes and classifies them. Ti examines all sides of an issue, looking to solve problems while minimizing effort and risk. It uses models to root out logical inconsistency.

In the ENTP, Ti analyzes the constant stream of information that Ne provides. Ti develops structure and reconciles any inconsistencies in the ENTP’s belief system.

However, Ti cannot match the activity of Ne, which leads the ENTP to juggle multiple projects and theoretical enterprises at any given time, in various stages of completion.

The Relief Role (Tertiary) – Extraverted feeling (Fe)

Fe seeks social connections and creates harmonious interactions through polite, considerate, and appropriate behavior. Fe responds to the explicit (and implicit) wants of others, and may even create an internal conflict between the subject’s own needs and the desire to meet the needs of others.

When Fe is well developed, the ENTP can foster goodwill in others, and can be seen as quite charming and loyal. When it is not well developed, the ENTP can be seen as aloof and unconcerned with other people’s feelings.

In most ENTPs, weakness of the tertiary function can be observed in its inconsistency or lack of endurance.

The Aspirational Role (Inferior) – Introverted sensing (Si)

Si collects data in the present moment and compares it with past experiences, a process that sometimes evokes the feelings associated with memory, as if the subject were reliving it. Seeking to protect what is familiar, Si draws upon history to form goals and expectations about what will happen in the future.

Si offsets the ENTP’s natural tendency toward anarchy and non-conformity. It acts as a sort of gravitational pull that keeps the ENTP in orbit around reality.

Without this function, the ENTP can be seen as unpredictable and random, but when it is well developed, the ENTP is seen as orderly and understandable.

The Opposing Role – Introverted intuition (Ni):

Attracted to symbolic actions or devices, Ni synthesizes seeming paradoxes to create the previously unimagined. These realizations come with a certainty that demands action to fulfill a new vision of the future, solutions that may include complex systems or universal truths.

The Critical Parent Role – Extraverted thinking (Te):

Te organizes and schedules ideas and the environment to ensure the efficient, productive pursuit of objectives. Te seeks logical explanations for actions, events, and conclusions, looking for faulty reasoning and lapses in sequence.

The Deceiving Role – Introverted feeling (Fi):

Fi filters information based on interpretations of worth, forming judgments according to criteria that are often intangible. Fi constantly balances an internal set of values such as harmony and authenticity. Attuned to subtle distinctions, Fi innately senses what is true and what is false in a situation.

The Devilish Role – Extraverted sensing (Se):

Extraverted sensing focuses on the experiences and sensations of the immediate, physical world. With an acute awareness of the present surroundings, it brings relevant facts and details to the forefront and may lead to spontaneous actionn.