Tag Archives: Employment

How to Get Endorsed for Skills on LinkedIn

Getting more endorsements on LinkedIn for skills — applicable both to yourself and the types of job you seek — is an important aspect of any modern career development.
THE TABOO IS GONE:

It used to mean that if someone was active on LinkedIn = they’re looking for a job. Times have changed. Now, it is accepted that people use LinkedIn… actually it’s expected.

WHY PEOPLE USE LINKEDIN:

  • To manage their network of professional connections.
  • To share their ideas and tips with others in your field.

  • To seek advice for a professional challenge you’re facing.

  • To give advice out to others for a professional challenge that they face.

  • To expand your network (more connections = more visibility & more chances of being discovered).

  • To always be ready. Your résumé, essentially, is in a constant state of keeping up to date.

  • To connect with people that might be able to help you get the job you want.

  • To connect with people that you’re considering for recruitment.

Personally, I invest an equal amount of effort adding contacts that could potentially help me or with whom I someday may want to recruit for myself. I also help connect others to their destinations, when I can.*

* = See “Law of Reciprocation” at the end.

GET ENDORSED FOR YOUR SKILLS:

  1. Establish & maintain continuous, gradual expansion of your network of connections.
  • Endorse other people often.

  • Done.

  • LAW OF RECIPROCATION:

    If you endorse “Joe” for a skill he has, the probability that Joe will endorse you for a skill increase exponentially.

    When you do something nice to someone, they feel compelled to return the favor. This is especially true on LinkedIn, with the endorsement of skills, because to do so is extremely simple, easy, and not time-consuming.

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    Gifted Individuals Make a Significant Contribution to Innovation in Organizations

    With their creative talents, gifted individuals can make a useful contribution to innovations within organizations. Highly gifted individuals possess many more creative possibilities than the average gifted person.

    three-ring_model_of_giftedness

    To make use of their innovative ideas and to implement them, however, an effective interaction between gifted individuals and their work environment is essential.

    How do gifted individuals contribute to innovation?

    GiftedThinking

    • The gifted individual can easily identify the relationships between goals, missions, and assignments.
    • The gifted individual has the ability to focus intensely on the content.
    • Arguments based on content are key.
    • Habits, traditions and social pressure are quickly spotted. If these seem to be in conflict with the content, they are discarded as being irrelevant.
    • Thinking ‘outside of the box’ is second nature to them.
    • Switching between one’s own professional area and other disciplines is no problem at all.
    • The opinion of a formal authority does not weigh any heavier than the opinion of another party.
    • Information from others is checked against one’s own experience or against other information.
    • The gifted individual has a high degree of commitment and passion.
    • Existing protocols, structures and approaches are only followed if they seem to be effective and are well-founded.
    • A customized solution is sought for each individual situation, often when this has not been requested. ‘Standard problems’ are also approached in this way.

    Favorable environmental factors required for making use of these contributions are listed below. The favorable characteristics listed correspond strongly with the ‘task culture’ and ‘person culture,’ while the unfavorable characteristics correspond with the ‘role culture’ or ‘power culture’ from “Harrison’s typologies of organizational culture.

    Favorable and Unfavorable Organizational Characteristics for the Gifted

    Favorable organizational characteristics:

    • Flexibility.
    • Little hierarchy.
    • Few procedures (only if they are useful).
    • The development and needs of employees are of importance.
    • Room for productive conflicts.
    • Power and influence can be acquired through expertise, dedication and success (or, at most, through personality, ability and outstanding performances).

    Unfavorable organizational characteristics:

    • Procedures determine the work.
    • Power and influence are predominantly dependent upon your position.
    • The development and needs of the employee are of little importance.
    • Conflicts are often avoided.

    How can giftedness be recognized?

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    If an employee arrives at your consulting room, how do you recognize the above-mentioned characteristics of giftedness?

    • Wide interest in all kinds of fields (curious and passionate).
    • Sensitive to, such as, noise at work (highly sensitive).
    • Can speak passionately about a subject that interests him or her, starts speaking more quickly, the eyes light up, makes agitated gestures (passionate).
    • Quick analyses of the work situation: ‘that’s how it works’ (highly intelligent).
    • Focussed primarily on the content of the work (highly intelligent).
    • Wants to work in his/her own way (autonomous).
    • Wants to see a lot of variety in the work (creation-directed).
    • Produces unorthodox solutions that are not generally accepted (sparkling original).

    Focus points for the problem analysis

    • Gifted individuals suffer relatively often from stress and burnout. Factors that can be of influence here are the nature of the work (sufficient challenge), the degree of autonomy and the defining of borders. Gifted employees are especially passionate and have the tendency to insufficiently specify their own limits.
    • Bullying, or other forms of aggression: because a gifted individual does not fit the requirements of the ‘average’ employee. As a result, fear/anxiety disorders may arise.
    • Depressive feelings often start at an early age. Gifted individuals can therefore more easily feel lonely and isolated.
    • Fear of failure as a result of setting the bar high and the tendency to perfectionism.
    • The gifted individual can come across as having ADHD. The combination of giftedness and ADHD is not uncommon.
    • Gifted individuals have a high sensitivity for odors and sounds.
    • They more quickly experience certain circumstances as being a hindrance.

    Being Divergent in a Team Atmosphere, Without Having to “Walk the Plank”

    Backwards Time Machine

    Does anyone else have the “curse” of explaining an opposing argument so well, your peers think you’re on the “other side” and start attacking you?


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    Being a Visionary is Not as Easy as it Looks

    I’m a natural devil’s advocate, and somebody who constantly thinks of every alternative possibility.

    Throughout my professional career, there have been a few situations where me trying to bring up opposing arguments, for improvement of the project / idea, resulted in a team turning on me.

    The Visionary / ENTP Personality Type

  • ENTPs love to argue and consider it a sport, sometimes hurting those who don’t. They like proving their points and showing others how impressive they are.
  • They are masters at improvising and are usually good at everything they put their minds too.
  • Interested in almost everything, they become pleased with people who are skilled and talented.
  • Once something they are interested in is no…
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    ENTPs Make Poor Managers but Exceptional Leaders

    I was asked on a forum “how an ENTP can be an effective manager.” My original advice:

    • Look busy.
    • Keep making the rounds.
    • Allow people to know you for your spontaneity and use it as a plus (like you could be checking up on them at any time).
    • Stay available to reach.
    • Find a great ISTJ assistant who naturally thrives on organization.

    When I try too hard to stay organized, I usually end up exhausting all of my effort into creating the organizational tool (that’s just me personally). I find that by staying in motion and in touch with every department, your natural Ne will pick up on the missing pieces. I could spend ten hours inventing a method to stay on top of everything, or I could simply walk around and allow it to happen naturally.

    ENTPs don’t make good “traditional managers,” but can still be quite effective, even in traditional corporate environments (if the structure isn’t too rigid).

    To add upon my earlier half-joking statements about “looking busy and keep making the rounds,” or my support of getting an ISTJ secretary, the true power of an ENTP manager / leader comes from their ability to delegate, empower, and encourage. It is this quality that makes for poor ENTP managers but exceptional ENTP leaders.

    ENTPs don’t want to demand stuff of others, because we hate it when it’s done to us. However, an ENTP can delegate out responsibilities by simply asking, explaining why it’s important, and making their subordinates feel empowered and trusted. This makes an ENTP manager / leader a force to be reckoned with, and soon you’ll have the staff working with you to accomplish the goals, not simply working for you out of fear of reprimand.

    Surprise me

    The staff will respect and trust you, because you respect and trust them. I know it sounds cliché, but it actually works. Employees will work HARDER for you than any other type of manager, or should I say, leader. Good luck!

    Chris Hoeller – What’s Your Story?

    To be blunt, I’m a creative genius that took a “unique” path in life. I had a kid in high school and so didn’t go to Harvard as I had planned (not that I really hold any traditional education up with high regard, anyways). I got a job at a local restaurant, simply because I needed a source of income.

    I moved up the ladder ridiculously quick. I was recruited to run a start-up restaurant, which I opened with massive success (designing every process, hiring every employee, developing managers, creating the marketing, watching the accounting). I had a falling out with the owner, as he no longer needed someone to design the systems that had already been designed (he replaced me with himself).

    I stumbled for a while as I finished a degree, not knowing what I wanted to do with my life. I got a job as a marketing manager, but most of my work was truly of a strategic, behind-the-scenes nature. I innovated entire departments using creative solutions. I was able to use my cross-functional, multi-industry experience to see things from a fresh perspective.

    As I looked for work, I became reattached to my roots as a creative problem solver. I was reminded of the work I did as a child and the large-scale of impact I could have.

    I became limitless, again, but I didn’t know exactly where to fully use this potential or how to prove what I was capable of. So, I network with people I see potential in, and I post what I’m thinking about. I await for someone with means to see in me what I see in others: their true potential.

    It’s not ideal, sitting and waiting, and it’s rather frustrating, so I apply for certain jobs. But, from the bottom of my heart, I believe that my greatest potential will be noticed by someone looking at a wider portrait than merely a resume or CV. It’s how I would recruit for someone like me.

     

    The ENTP Writing Personality: Energetic Innovation

    “Obedience hardly ever begets
    innovation.”

    – Neil deGrasse Tyson

    Can learning about personality type help you make the most of your natural writing / leadership style?

    ENTP writers enjoy the pre-writing stage. They may come up with many good ideas quickly.

    Often skilled at detecting patterns and envisioning outcomes, they trust their insight and resist prescribed methods. The writing process itself may prove tedious to them, but if they persevere, their work is often thorough and multifaceted.

    The ENTP personality type is one of 16 identified by the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, a popular psychometric instrument used to determine how people prefer to gather information and make decisions. The initials ENTP indicate the following:

    E: Extraversion preferred to introversion

    ENTPs get their energy from people and activity in their external world. Spending time alone can leave them listless and bored. They enjoy interacting with a large group of friends and acquaintances. They generally act before reflecting.

    N: iNtuition preferred to sensation

    ENTPs are abstract thinkers, placing more trust in flashes of insight than in experience. They’re less interested in sensory data than in the patterns perceived by the unconscious mind. ENTPs tend to be intellectually restless—they want to change the world.

    T: Thinking preferred to feeling

    ENTPs prefer to use their thinking function when making decisions. They place more emphasis on the rule of logic than on the effect that actions have on people. They tend to be skeptical in evaluating ideas, whether their own or someone else’s.

    P: Perception preferred to judgment

    ENTPs like to keep their options open. They enjoy beginning new projects and exploring opportunities as they arise. ENTPs think in terms of possibilities rather than likelihoods.

    Are you an ENTP writer or content creator? If so, the following information may give you some insight into how temperament influences your writing style. Use these insights to help you play to your strengths and compensate for your natural blind spots.

    Of course these strategies would apply to non-writers as well… really any position that requires you to get a message across, which could include Marketing / Advertising, Leadership / Management in general, and other types of professions. (Such as being a Teacher, Lawyer, or an Entrepreneur).

    Writing Process of the ENTP

    If you’re an ENTP, you may approach a writing project in the following ways:

    – You’re rarely at a loss for ideas. While many people struggle to find a topic, you may have difficulty limiting yourself to just one.

    – You may enjoy exploring controversial subjects or devising clever solutions to problems. Have fun playing with different possibilities, and see where they lead you.

    – You can benefit from collaborative writing projects. Chances are, you prefer an active, high-energy environment. You may enjoy discussing and debating your ideas with others.

    – You will probably assert your individuality even within the group. If someone else is leading the project, be careful that your natural tendency to ignore authority doesn’t undermine the team. If you maintain goodwill, you’ll stand a better chance of convincing someone else to do the actual writing.

    – You may do well to compose an article, essay, or story by speaking into a voice recorder. If the thought of transcribing the recording sounds unbearably tedious to you, consider paying (or persuading) someone else to do it.

    – To sustain your enthusiasm, gather visual elements to use in the piece. Devise your own strategies to make the writing process more interesting.

    – You are motivated by a desire to innovate.

    – You tend to seek a unique approach even to ordinary topics. Conversely, you tend to be good at making complex subjects clear and interesting. Stay focused, and let your desire to prove your competence and ingenuity drive you forward until the project is complete.

    Potential Blind Spots of the ENTP

    As an ENTP, you may experience the following pitfalls:

    – You generally enjoy brainstorming but may not feel motivated to write until you feel the pressure of a deadline. To avoid a time crunch at the end of the project, set milestones along the way. Make your best guess of how long each step should take, then double it. Schedule enough time to take breaks so you can consider new possibilities.

    – To stay energized, try working in a variety of settings.

    – You may excel at satire, and humor can liven up your work. Make sure your tone is appropriate for the piece and for the audience.

    – You may find it helpful to include a personal story or two, rather than relying on cold logic alone to make your point.

    – You tend to grasp the big picture and to focus on the future. Ensure that your work contains enough background material and concrete detail. To avoid tangents or a cursory treatment of the subject, keep the central thesis or purpose of the project in mind while writing. Solicit feedback from someone whose competence you trust.

    Remember, there’s no right or wrong approach to writing. Each individual is unique, so don’t let generalities limit you. Do what works best for you.

    Translation

    My technical terms may be off here and there, but I think that’s a plus…

    I may only have a paraphrased, Wikipedia-sized amount of knowledge on your topic, but I have a lot of topics stored up. I see patterns and connect the dots to create something new. I see the big picture, and I can adapt it to any situation.

    Not to mention the incredible opportunities when I’ve been able to actually use this to my advantage. They couldn’t predesign the path I’ve followed, but it surely outranks any MBA out there.

    Until you’ve held an entire business’s life in your hands, you’re still in training.

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